Goldblog will be publishing a back and forth with Beinart soon, but for now he laments the placement of the piece in the New York Review of Books, "the one-stop shopping source for bien-pensant anti-Israelism." In the day of the web, what does it matter where an argument is placed? The point is the argument, not any associations. The era of media authoritah is over. Ackerman understandably balks at the characterization and dives into the substance:

Peter is right that it’s the moral task of Zionist liberals like, well, himself and myself and the J Street generation to save Zionist liberalism. But if you’re Malcolm Hoenlein or Abe Foxman, why should you care what pischers like us think? You’ve got aspirant Republican officeholders tripping over each other to profess their deep faith in Israel. That should underscore the urgency of the J Street generation.

Ezra Klein notes the disparity between the understandably apocalyptic psyches of many among the older generation and, well, reality:

Today, Israel is far, far, far more militarily powerful than any of its assailants.

None of the region's armies would dare face the Jewish state on the battlefield, and in the event that they tried, they would be slaughtered. Further stacking the deck is America's steadfast support of Israel. Any serious threat would trigger an immediate defense by the most powerful army the world has ever known. In effect, Israel's not only the strongest power in the region, but it has the Justice League on speed dial.

That is not to say that the Jewish state is not under threat. Conventional attacks pose no danger, but one terrorist group with one nuclear weapon and one good plan could do horrible damage to the small, dense country. That threat, however, is fundamentally a danger born of the Arab world's hatred of Israel. It follows, then, that hastening the peace that will begin to ease that hatred makes Israel safer. Exacerbating the tensions that feed it, conversely, only makes the threat more severe.

Thank God for the blogosphere. This debate would have been squelched without it.

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