A reader writes:

I am a 32 year old professional woman.  I work as a paralegal at a law firm in a major city and have been in the legal field since I was 19.  I smoke pot every night and have smoked pot regularly since high school.  I smoke far more than my male partner at home (I often call him a lightweight and tell him I can "smoke him under the table").  I do 90% of the buying in our house, mainly because I smoke so much more than him.  I also work out every day.  Why?  Because I smoke pot, get the munchies, and chow down on something sugary and sweet every night.  

My best friend of 12 years is also in the legal field, also smokes every night, also smokes far more than her husband and does 100% of the buying for their house. I guess we are not normal but I see nothing wrong with my habits and have never felt guilty about it.

Another writes:

I heard an interview with Linda Ronstadt in which she said she never got into drugs in the '60s and '70s because marijuana made her want to "crawl under the bed with a bag of Oreos and NOT SHARE."

Another:

Your reader who touched on the Sativa/Indica distinction made a good point.  Sativa gives an energetic, psychedelic, thought-a-minute experience -- a "head high".  Classic clean-the-house-high stuff.  An Indica-dominant strain, on the other hand, will produce much more of a body high and that "couch lock" sensation.  Because of its growth characteristics -- short, bushy, dense with buds -- Indica is a more efficient choice for indoor growers, and as such has come to dominate the market.  A legal market that places less of a prime on covert guerrilla grows could see a huge resurgence for sativa strains.

Also, I noticed that the "10 Rules for Dealing with Police" video stars one of Baltimore's lead defense attorneys (and guest star on The Wire), Billy Murphy. It's real worthwhile stuff, thanks for pointing it out.  And I love your "cannabis closet" and "women who get high" series, please keep them coming!

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