Chait wonders if today's social liberals will become tomorrow's social conservatives:

Generally speaking, social policy has grown less restrictive throughout American history. People are are currently 70 years old are far more liberal on, say, the question of women's suffrage than were people fifty years their senior. But women's suffrage is settled fact, and no longer exerts any electoral impact. Several decades from now, we may well be looking at an even more liberal or left-wing social issue landscape. Today's young voters are much less freaked out about an African-American president than are today's old voters. But what about fifty years from now when the Democrats have nominated a transgendered Presidential candidate?

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