A reader writes:

I was absolutely stunned to see the Madison, Wisconsin view posted in your blog.  From 1980 to 1982, when I was in college at the University of Wisconsin, I lived in the house from which that shot was taken (or perhaps the house next door), near the corner of Mifflin and Broom Streets.  So 30 years ago, that was the view from my window.

Back then, the building with the mural housed the Mifflin Street Food Co-Op, and it had a banner painted across the top that read:  "Food is for People.... not for Profit."  Other than the removal of those '60s inspired words, the view is basically the same as it was then.  Even then, the now-defunct co-op was a trip back in time.  Customers bought bulk ingredients in their own recycled containers, organic produce, and foods produced by small, local manufacturers from the staff of hippy volunteers.  Often the store was permeated with the fragrant aroma of burning herb.  This single photograph transported me back there, again.   Thank you for this great feature!

Another writes:

I bought your window view book but I just want to tell you how very much I appreciate and enjoy the daily feature.  No matter what else is going on in the world -- no matter how barbaric people are to each other, or how nonsensical the Cheneys/Palins/Becks/Limbaughs of the world can be on a daily basis, I find myself really looking for my daily respite, that "fix" of quietude and appreciation for the simple.  And I wonder about the person behind the lens.

A few weeks ago you published my photo, from my own little corner of Portland, Oregon.  After I sent in a number of different photos, I think you picked the perfect one -- a tree filled with spring blossoms at a time when the whole Eastern part of the U.S. was dealing with crippling snowstorms.  I hope that photo gave others a glimpse of warmer, more pleasant days ahead in the same way that seeing the world through the eyes of others gives me a sense of real pleasure and delight.

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