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A reader writes:

I'm a full-time working mother of two small children.  A couple nights a week, after the kids are in bed, I smoke a bowl, usually shared with my husband.  This is so much better then having a couple beers or a glass of wine.  I'm not hungover the next day and it's easier on the wallet.  I can fully relax at night, tune out a bit and I'm able to go to work the next day, no problems.  If it's a weekend I can fully interact with my children without ever having to say, "Shhh, mommy's got a headache." 

Fortunately for me, I live in a middle-class neighborhood and I'm white, so if the cops ever bust down my door they'll probably leave before arresting me because the paperwork's not worth it.  Maybe that's why the illegality of it doesn't bother me.

Granted, my office doesn't know; it's my private life.  But all our friends know - they either agree or keep their judgments to themselves.  Both my kids are incredibly happy children.  Maybe my kids are incredibly happy because their parents have learned to chill out without having to plop them down in front of the TV on Saturday and Sunday mornings so we can recover from drinking the night before. 

Conservatives in the country want less government, and then get all riled up when people are doing private things they disagree with?  I just don't get it.  How can they demand to have it both ways?  I understand which lobbyists are paying these politicians (God help Miller and Budweiser when pot becomes legal).

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