Rachel Aimee, a former stripper, and Katrin Redfern, a feminist and sex workers right advocate, argue against the legislation in the Reykjavík Grapevine:

If the women working in Iceland’s strip clubs were trafficked, they have debts to pay to their traffickers, who are not likely to wait around while they pay them back by doing whatever low paying jobs exist for undocumented immigrants in Icelandthey will likely be trafficked to another country to work in the sex industry, probably accumulating more debt in the process. If these women migrated to Iceland by themselves to work in the sex industry, they will find a way to migrate to another country to work in the sex industry, spending their own hard-earned cash or getting themselves into debtor possibly debt-bondage situationsin the process. [...]

According to FrͰa Rós Valdimarsdóttir, an Icelandic specialist working in the field of human trafficking and prostitution prevention, it is “highly unlikely” that the strippers at the centre of the debate were consulted for their views on the proposed change in legislation.

Previous Dish discussion here and here.

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