Pivoting off a good column by Peggy Noonan, Dreher reflects:

I think future historians will observe a near-catastrophic "epistemic closure" in key institutions of this era. The Church leadership's inability to grasp the true nature of the situation, and their role in the crisis. One thinks of the political leadership of this country through most of the 2000s, and how it got into terrible trouble because of the same epistemic closure (a fancy way of saying "living in a bubble"). I am once again reminded of my friend the top investment banker, who, roundabout 2004, looked around him at a banker's summit and saw his colleagues behaving like spoiled princes at a bacchanal -- and concluded that their privilege insulated them from any sense of reality, which would lead to disaster. As it did.

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