Jessica Crispin has a whimsical article on the history of the mind's dark corners:

Even if you provided me with incontrovertible proof that my dreams were meaningless (who knows what such evidence would even look like), I would still spend my mornings documenting my dreams in detail and associating out the visuals. I really do wish I could be more rational honestly, it's a goal of mine. And yet that "proven" column, with its right angles and straight lines, its belief that depression is a chemical imbalance best treated with SSRIs, that dreams are problem-solving mechanisms and not symbol-laden poetry, that the physical plane is the only one there is...

As someone who has ended relationships because of dreams, and had prolonged periods of unexplained (I would say hysterical) blindness, I don't quite fit in there. The white coats often look into that unscientific past and see merely superstition and fear, useless nonsense. But hidden in the mire, we have thinkers and ideas, waiting for their wisdom to be re-acknowledged.

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