Renard Sexton argues that David Cameron has failed to unite his party. He blames Cameron's reluctance to consummate the "marriage of economic conservatism and social conservatism– a union that reliably wins elections for the right across Europe and north America":

Cameron, in his quest to create a palatable, "non-nasty" Conservative party, has managed to devoid his caucus of most of the ideas that motivate centre-right and rightwing voters – except for the lower-tax, pro-business elite. Learning from the failures of 2005, he has downplayed the immigration and foreign workers issue and has barely touched on religion, though he said previously that he would build them into the campaign.

He follows up at 538:

He's waited too late to shore up support in the right-wing, and will now try to do it with loads of skittish moderates watching. Many of these centrists previously were not so interested in the campaign and would likely have missed the more hard-core overtures if they had been done last year or early in 2010.

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