You might think that a magazine founded in part on intellectual Catholicism would have something to say about a church crisis that many now see as the worst since the Reformation. You'd be wrong. National Review has nothing on its home-page and The Corner has in a week only two brief references to official church authorities in defending the Pope. 

Any journalistic institution can cover what it likes, as far as I'm concerned. Equally, I can notice when it seems struck silent. But I do this not out of bloggy rivalry, but because it reveals, I think, a deeper truth. Once you surrender your intellect to authority, i.e. once your ideas about something are subject to the approval of a given authority-figure, rather than simply following one's own mind and judgment, you have given up the task of critical thinking. You are a propagandist for institutions (GOP, Limbaugh, RNC, the Vatican). Sometimes, the interests of the institutions - as perceived by the institutions - are best served by silence. And so silence reigns at NRO.

If you want to see a symptom of the intellectual decline of orthodox Catholicism, look no further. That's part of the church's crisis too.

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