E.D. Kain would like to have real immigration reform:

Unlike Conor, I think building a wall is a very bad idea, doomed to failure. A ladder is a simple enough solution to the problem of a wall. A shovel is nearly as good. Opening up legal immigration to many, many more immigrants is the only thing that will reduce the influx of illegal immigrants.

To combat the problem of drug smugglers we need to rethink our policies on drugs, and begin to dismantle our enormously foolish war on drugs – beginning with the truly insane approach to marijuana.

Lexington had related thoughts a few days ago:

[It] is impossible to secure a 2,000 mile land border against economic migrants. So long as there are jobs to come to, they will find a way. The only way to relieve pressure on the border is to allow a realistic number of migrants into America, ie one that bears some resemblance to the demand for their labour. When demand falls, (as in the current recession) fewer come, and many go home.

In the medium term, trying to secure the border before you address immigration reform is like trying to stop dust flying into your vacuum cleaner without turning off the suction.

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