by Patrick Appel

Frank Newport compares current polling on health care reform to 1960s polling on Medicare:

Although support for Medicare fluctuated, it appears to have engendered at least a plurality margin of approval in contemporaneous Gallup polls. Most current polls measuring new healthcare legislation find at least a plurality opposed.

Awhile back Seth Masket argued that polls are not a very good way to judge this issue:

Health reform is tremendously complex and the media don't do a great job reporting on it substantively.  Opinion polls on the subject are highly sensitive to issues of question wording and ordering.  If you want to know whether people approve of the job Obama is doing or for whom they intend to vote in the next election, polls are pretty reliable.  But for this subject, it's just not terribly revealing.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.