by Alex Massie

Early voting has begun in Iceland's referendum on whether it will honour the terms of an agreement its  government made with the British and Dutch authorities to repay £3.5bn those governments paid out to investors in Icleand's broken, bankrupt banks.

The Icelanders feel as though they've been bullied (especially by the British) and it's hard not to agree with them. Quite why the Icelandic government should be held responsible for the British government's entirely voluntary decision to bail out savers and investors is a mystery.

Worse still was the manner in which her Majesty's Government treated Iceland - seizing all Icelandic assets in the UK and using anti-terrorism legislation to do so. This was a) disgraceful and b) a reminder of how dangerous such laws are and how subject and open to abuse they really are.

This being the case, I'm with the plucky Icelanders. Vote No!

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