by Patrick Appel

A reader writes:

So let me get this straight: the D.C. archdiocese’s opposition to marriage equality trumps its affirmative commitment to celebrating marriage writ large? I thought marriage was sacrament. Shouldn't the Church's policies at a minimum support and affirm the sacraments?

And how come the other marriages that the church considers invalid didn't cause such a stir? Another reader:

I note that Catholic Charities chose the cheapest option on the table, which not only avoids providing benefits to same-sex spouses (and roommates, parents, and other adults as under the Archdiocese of San Francisco's plan) but to any spouses at all. Great way to trim the budget in a recession. Way to go! And note that employees' children apparently will still be covered, even if one of their (legally married) parents is not. That will do wonders for the Church's stated purpose of strengthening the institution of the family, I am sure.

The irony is that Catholic Charities has several programs providing health care to the uninsured, which will now include spouses of the agency's employees.

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