An Iranian reader writes:

Only 21 hours left till the equinox and the arrival of spring/Persian New Year known as Nowruz. This ancient tradition is the most important of Persian festivities. We sit around a spread called the Haft Sin (seven items that start with the letter S).  Traditionally, families set as beautiful a Haft Sin table as they can, as it is not only of traditional and spiritual value, but also noticed by visitors during Nowruzi visitations and is a reflection of their good taste. Based on the same tradition, if a family has lost a loved one in the previous year, they take their Haft Sin to the grave of their loved one on the last Thursday of the year.

The painful scene of Neda Agha Soltan's mother and many people who joined her at the grave of Neda with her Haft Sin is a reminder of the terror and brutality Iranians faced for demanding their basic rights in the year that is about to end. She cries: "How do I change my year without you…my Neda..who do I scream this pain too…I wish I were dead and would never see this….."

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