A reader writes:

She was just being polite to her hosts. Nothing is better than Chicago pizza.

Another writes:

The only explanation I can come up with after having read this post is that you somehow managed to apply the wrong label. Clearly it was meant to be a Von Hoffman Award Nominee for being so stunningly and utterly wrong. Now I can understand the need for Mrs. Obama to pander to the "cardboard with a dash of cheese" crowd, and certainly forgive her for making such an odd lie in those circumstances. But you should try and be more careful when it comes to titling posts.

Another:

For the first time in my adult life, I am disappointed in Michelle Obama.

Another:

Speaking as a Chicagoan who is willing to passionately defend my city's many indispensable culinary traditions, I feel obligated to note that I do not in any way disagree with the First Lady's preference for New York pizza. To wit: many of us consider our reputation for deep dish pizza to be a constant source of civic embarrassment.

On the other hand, our hot dogs are unmatched and only a great fool would take a cheese-steak over a Chicago-style Italian Beef sandwich.

Another:

Chicago has much more than the deep dish. But I'll take a pizza that puts fresh ingredients and a painstaking attention to sauce over foldability any day.  As a Chicagoan, I now disown her.

Another:

South side Chicago girl giving it up for New York's thin, too greasy, not-saucy-enough pizza? That's a potential pandering award.  Not sure if you have a category for that.

Another:

For the quote to be nominated for one of your awards, wouldn't it have to be....accurate?  At least this article indicates it is not.  Saying, "It's great pizza, and I'm from Chicago" is not the same as saying the pizza is better than Chicago's.  Until you can confirm that the quote is as you state, I think it's not fair to nominate it.

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