Reihan sighs:

If you believe as I do that the president's health reform legislation will not perform as advertised, you can see it as a failure of the policy itself. Or you can see it as an inevitable consequence of the fact that the legislation was, as liberal wonks insist, a "moderate Republican bill," one that true progressives supported only very reluctantly. So to fix the legislation, we'll need to spend more money, further centralize the system, and impose tighter regulation and control. And if that doesn't work, well, clearly we need to spend still more money, centralize the system even more, and impose even tighter regulation and control. Wash, rinse, repeat.

Or, of course, if you make sensible and pragmatic suggestions from the right, you could improve it in a more market-directed fashion. Why don't conservatives focus on that? Why don't they now insist that they in Congress will make sure those Medicare cuts go through to save money - and hold Obama's feet to the fire. Because it might be good in the long term for the country and therefore bad in the short-term for the GOP?

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.