Heartbreaking - and unintentionally revealing - details from Milwaukee's paper:

Budzinski, whose sign language was spoken by his daughter GiGi, said Murphy would come into their dorm at night, take them into a closet and molest them. Budzinski, who detailed abuse at the hands of Murphy to the Journal Sentinel in 2006, said he told Archbishop William E. Cousins and other officials about the abuse in 1974 when he was 26. The archbishop yelled at Budzinski, he said. He left the meeting crying.

From that 2006 two-part series:

Murphy, who was fluent in sign language, became a key link to the hearing world for the many deaf children who, like Budzinski, were unable to talk with their hearing parents.

"Back then there was no way to communicate," said his mother, Irene Budzinski, 89. "I never learned sign language. When you had a deaf child, the public health nurse would say, 'Send them to some school.' We were looking for a good place.

"Who would think any harm would come to a young child?"

Steve Geier, 55, of Madison, who became deaf after a high fever, remembered being left at St. John's at age 8 as his mother and father walked back to the car. His mother, he said, had tears running down her face.

"Here is my mom and dad, talk, talk, talk, talk, and I am looking at them," he said. "My suitcase gets put down, and my mom and dad said we have to go home. So I go running after them. They said 'No, you stay here.' It was confusing and I cried."

Murphy would console him.

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