Joyner weighs in:

[U]nlike Michelle Malkin, Dan Riehl, and others, I do think Republican leaders have some responsibility to condemn violence.  No, I don’t think they’re directly responsible for any of it; we don’t yet even know for sure who’s making the threats.  But we’ve had over a year of very heated rhetoric over the dire consequences that would flow from a government takeover of one sixth of the economy, death panels, legislation being rammed through with dirty tricks, and all the rest.   That’s part and parcel of American politics these days and mostly fine.  But, with signs that people are going off the rails evidence, it’s time for leaders to calm their followers.

Cantor says it is "reckless to use these incidents as media vehicles for political gain." He adds:

I’ve received threats since I assumed elected office, not only because of my position, but also because I’m Jewish. I’ve never blamed anyone in this body for that. Period…

Just recently I have been directly threatened. A bullet was shot through the window of my campaign office in Richmond this week. And I received threatening emails. But I will not release them, because I believe such actions will only encourage more to be sent.

Josh Marshall protests and calls Cantor's "behavior is shameful beyond imagining."

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