David Clohessy the director of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, doesn't want Benedict to quit but to "disclose the records of the hundreds of predator priests he dealt with during the years he headed the Vatican agency charged with this sorry chore":

Benedict's resignation, at this point especially, would foster the tempting but naive view that change is happening. It would not address the deeply rooted, unhealthy, systemic dysfunctions that plague any medieval institution that vests virtually all power in a pope who allegedly supervises 5,000 bishops across the planet.

If the pope were to step down, like Cardinal Bernard Law did in Boston, it would create the illusion of reform while decreasing the chances of real reform.

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