A reader writes:

Perhaps there is a reason why political commentators should refrain from, or perhaps even stay fully clear of, theological speculation.  They suck at it.  When Glenn Beck does it, I struggle to be surprised.  When you do, I cringe.  You define “social justice” from a political perspective, and miss the point entirely.  A Christian (Biblical) understanding of social justice is EXACTLY about redistribution of wealth. 

Read Isaiah at any length, and notice the wrath against the wealthy simply because they dare to be rich while others are poor.  When Jesus quotes Isaiah in his first sermon in Luke 4, the “day of the Lord’s favor” he highlights (aka the Old Testament law of Jubilee) is all about taking from the wealthy and returning to society.  It is not about providing a “safety net” for the poor, no more than warm feelings of doing good brought on by the occasional (but not too hurtful) work of charity.  It is about creating on Earth a shadow of the freedom from greed that defines heaven. That these concepts do not fit in with classic definitions of good capitalism is precisely what makes them a witness to the God who judges not by works but by Grace.

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