Just for the record, in November 2003, when Ramesh Ponnuru was defending a travesty of parliamentary procedure to pass a completely-unfunded multi-trillion-dollar, Rove-inspired pre-election bribe to seniors, this far leftist was writing:

We're beginning to realize that GOP has nothing to do with small government or fiscal sobriety. It's a vehicle for massive debt and catering to the worst forms of corporate welfare. Thank God for McCain. Bush should veto this [energy] bill, until it is de-porked. He won't, of course. He has yet to veto a single big-spending bill. He doesn't seem to give a damn about what is happening to the fiscal health of this country.

On the Medicare bill, the Dish was virulently opposed on fiscal grounds, and didn't let the Democrats off either:

Their paleo response to the Medicare bill is truly depressing. There are many reasons to oppose this bill - most importantly that it wll destroy the remaining threads of fiscal hope. But to oppose even experimentation with cost-cutting reforms reveals a party completely bankrupt of new ideas... The GOP has now no crediibility as a party of fiscal discipline or small government. It's just another tool of special interests - as beholden to them as the Dems are to theirs. Its pork barrel excesses may now be worse than the Dems, and the president seems completely unable or unwilling to restrain them. I know I'm a broken record on this but we truly need some kind of third force again in American politics - fiscally conservative, socially inclusive, and vigilant against terror. Last week has shown us why.

I guess I want to reiterate my consistent fiscal conservatism, against the smears of the bloggy right. And that's why I support this health insurance reform bill, because it promises to actually cut Medicare and to experiment with serious cost-controls. Obama is to the fiscal right of Kerry in 2003, and, of course, to the fiscal right of Sarah "Death Panels" Palin in 2010.

One other thing worth noting from that November. The partisan right have long tried to argue that my position on Iraq shifted because of the FMA on marriage equality. But you'll see from the archives that I'm up in arms about the amendment and still embarrassingly pro-Bush on the war.

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