Resistance to national standards for schools has long been a bipartisan effort; the far right fears that the feds will impose "liberal" curriculum, while the far left resists accountability for teachers' unions.  But TNR highlights some headway in breaking that resistance:

[H]ere’s the most surprising thing: The movement to create national standards isn’t coming from Washington; it’s coming from the states themselves. Last week, the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers released a draft of rigorous common standards. These benchmarks would not be enforced by the federal government; rather, they would be voluntarily adopted by the states. An impressive 48 states participated in drafting the standards. (The predictable holdouts? Texas and Alaska.) Already, several have pledged to adopt them. And the National Association of State Boards of Education expects that half of the states will sign on by the end of the year.

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