Dan Savage takes stock after the latest signs of movement from the White House:

Great, good, feeling hopey again about the repeal of DADT. But, again, Obama could suspend the enforcement of DADT today while Congress works on a solution, just as his head of Homeland Security suspended enforcement of the widow's penalty while Congress works on a solution. And Obama described the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) as abhorrent and promised to repeal it but his administration nevertheless defended the law in court. But I'm prepared to take yes for an answer, of course, on DADT. As depressing as the lack of movement on the big promisesend DADT, repeal DOMAthere has been action on ending the HIV Travel Ban (set in motion by the Bush administration), and hate crimes legislation.

I am waiting to hear what Gates and Mullen say before offering any judgment. But I do believe this strategy is potentially the best one. Apart from bigotry and paranoia, the only real argument for those who support allowing gays to serve under constant threat of persecution is that the military leadership supports it. If the defense secretary and the chairman of the joint chiefs explain why they no longer support it, and why it isn't working, and build their own strategy to end it, we have both a chance to do the right thing, strengthen the military and minimize the Christianist hatred and blow-back.

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