by Graeme Wood

Muammar al-Qadhafi chooses an interesting set of enemies. He banned Canadians last fall, after the Canadian PM criticized him for releasing the Lockerbie bomber.  And he has had a particularly durable grudge against the Swiss, ever since 2008, when Geneva police arrested his son Hannibal and daughter-in-law Alina for allegedly thrashing two maids at the Hotel President Wilson with a belt and coat-hanger.  (That grudge is partly why Red Cross staff can't fly Afriqiyah.)  The Colonel has also suggested that Germany, Italy, France, and Austria each absorb part of Switzerland, and obliterate the country altogether.  None of those countries has expressed much interest.

Now he wants jihad:

"Any Muslim in any part of the world who works with Switzerland is an apostate, is against (the Prophet) Mohammad, and God and the Koran," he told a meeting in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi.

In his rambling address he added: "The masses of Muslims must go to all airports in the Islamic world and prevent any Swiss plane landing, to all harbours and prevent any Swiss ships docking, inspect all shops and markets to stop any Swiss goods being sold."

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