Eugene Volokh doesn't understand the rationale of DADT with respect to lesbians:

[E]ven if we set aside antidiscrimination arguments and focus solely on military effectiveness (which may or may not be the right approach, but let’s use it here), it seems lesbians would tend to make better soldiers than straight women:

  1. They are less likely to get pregnant.
  2. They seem less likely to get sexually transmitted diseases.
  3. If the stereotypes about lesbians tending to act in more masculine ways are generally accurate hard to tell, for obvious measurement reasons, but that seems to be the conventional wisdom then that cuts further in favor of lesbians as opposed to straight women. Many women may well make great soldiers, but if we’re speaking about generalities, and the military policy is generally defended using generalizations, I’m happy to at least tentatively assume (as I suspect would the military) that stereotypically masculine traits and attitudes tend to be more useful for soldiering than stereotypically feminine ones.

The record suggests that lesbians have been discharged at higher rates than gay men.

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