Well, we thought we had it straight, however bizarre. But Palin will not let the Trig story alone and is now bragging about one of its stranger details:

"I didn't tell anybody for a long time. In fact, I think I probably had the world record. I went seven months without telling anybody I was pregnant, except for Todd, our doctor and a nurse. And matter of fact to this day if I didn't tell anybody ... up there in Alaska, it's so cold you just put on more layers, more clothes, and here I am chunking out and my staff is like "Governor, are you really that cold? Do you really want another coat?" "Yes it's chilly in here." But to this day, because my son Trig was born prematurely at seven and a half months and I didn't tell anyone I was pregnant for seven months, to this day, a lot of the haters, a lot of the bloggers out here, still say "'That couldn't have been her kid, because she was only pregnant for two weeks!' And I say, don't make me show you the stretch marks to prove it!"

Yes, please, don't show us. Just a medical record will do. And, by the way, the first person to make this kind of joke was not a "hater" but Palin herself in the New York Times:

At her baby shower, Ms. Palin joked about her months of secrecy, Ms. Lane said. “About the seventh month I thought I’d better let people know,” Ms. Palin said.

“So it was really great,” she continued. “I was only pregnant a month.”

Hence the new odd lie. She now says above that she announced she was pregnant at seven months and gave birth at seven and a half. But that is verifiably untrue in the public record. Palin told the world she was pregnant - to universal disbelief - on March 6, 2008. Trig Palin was born on April 18, 2008. That's six weeks, not two. The story has changed before as well. She gave birth in Wasilla, but recently said it was in Anchorage. You'll also notice that she says she hid her pregnancy under coats and clothes and layers even indoors, blaming the cold. In her original telling of the story, she said she thought her staff had already suspected the truth because they could see her clothes getting tighter and tighter. From the Anchorage Daily News at the time:

"I thought it was becoming obvious," Palin said. "You know, clothes getting snugger and snugger."

Now all of this could be explained - as with everything else - by Palin's generally cavalier attitude toward reality. In fact, that's the likeliest explanation. Every time she tells the story, it gets embellished a little, or changed by bad memory, or just because it has become a schtick. But would it be beyond a reporter to ask her to explain the increasing discrepancies in a story that she keeps telling in stump speeches across the country? And could I really go an anniversary week without a Trig relapse?

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.