The first time she went off on this tangent, it did not count as an odd lie, as the Dish defines it. It was a political smear and untruth of a classic variety, known to unscrupulous pols since time began. Money quote:

The America I know and love is not one in which my parents or my baby with Down Syndrome will have to stand in front of Obama's 'death panel' so his bureaucrats can decide, based on a subjective judgment of their 'level of productivity in society,' whether they are worthy of health care. Such a system is downright evil."

It was factually debunked, as the Pulitzer winner Politifact noted:

We have read all 1,000-plus pages of the Democratic bill and examined versions in various committees. There is no panel in any version of the health care bills in Congress that judges a person's "level of productivity in society" to determine whether they are "worthy" of health care.

This time, however, she has repeated it, despite the demonstrable fact that it is untrue.

Now you can legitimately worry that a healthcare system that will one day have to control costs may resort to some kind of rationing. But that is light years from a "death panel" assessing your productivity and whether you can live or die. As Dish readers know, this is a classic Palin odd lie because it restates something that everyone in reality knows to be untrue:

I was about laughed out of town for bringing to light what I called death panels because there's going to be faceless bureaucrats who will based on cost analysis and some subjective ideas on somebody's level of productivity in lifesomebody is going to call the shots as to whether your loved one will be able to receive healthcare or not: to me, death panels. I call it like I saw it, and people didn't like it.

Yes, she calls it like she sees it; and she is clinically delusional and incapable of distinguishing between fantasy and reality.

(Hat tip: Corn)

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