A reader argues that the visibility of a child with special needs trumps any worries that he is being subjected to too much too young:

I share concerns with your reader related to Palin's use of Trig as a prop. But:

1.  Perhaps this is powerful for families of special needs children to see.  Perhaps the more Palin uses Trig as a visual prop or references him in talks the easier it becomes for these families.  Perhaps it makes them feel more accepted (not sure if these families feel un-accepted - just reflecting). 

2. While I don't know, I suspect that many women/families have struggled with the choice to give birth to a special needs child.  I also suspect that while many continue with the pregnancy there are many who have decided to have an abortion. 

Perhaps these decisions related to the difficulties this child would pose in one's family, in one's general routines of life or otherwise.  If this were so, then I wonder if seeing a special needs child so openly, proudly and even normally apart of someone's life is meaningful for these folks (those who had the child or are going through this decision now). 

These are just the thoughts that come to mind as I see more and more pictures of Palin with Trig on stage.  Could it be that despite her motives, in this one instance, she is actually advancing a positive end by using Trig as a prop? 

To me it was a bigger deal when she appeared to use Trig as a prop during the campaign...

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