Johann Hari delved into it last week:

The people who really built the city can be seen in long chain-gangs by the side of the road, or  toiling all day at the top of the tallest buildings in the world, in heat that Westerners are told not to stay in for more than 10 minutes. They were conned into coming, and trapped into staying. In their home country – Bangladesh or the Philippines or India – these workers are told they can earn a fortune in Dubai if they pay a large upfront fee. When they arrive, their passports are taken from them, and they are told their wages are a tenth of the rate they were promised. They end up working in extremely dangerous conditions for years, just to pay back their initial debt. They are ringed-off in filthy tent-cities outside Dubai, where they sleep in weeping heat, next to open sewage. They have no way to go home. And if they try to strike for better conditions, they are beaten by the police.

Relatedly, James Estrin presents a photo essay of the city's decadent decline.

(Photo: OLIVER LANG/AFP/Getty Images. Hat tip: 3QD)

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