“I am entertained every time I see these people attack her and attack her and attack her. She’s irrelevant, but they continue to attack her. I am so proud of her and the work that she is doing,” - John McCain on Sarah Palin. I think he meant the "irrelevant" adjective to apply to those who both call her that and yet attack her.

But, look, this blog does not for a minute believe Palin is irrelevant. I think she's the de facto leader of the GOP at this point, certainly more so than McCain. And all the critics are doing is holding her to a basic standard: a) is what she says true? and b)  what policies does she propose for the problems we face? The answers we can glean at this point are: mostly no; and nothing but cliches and drilling for oil.

This blog, moreover, does not believe that Sarah Palin is the real issue here. The real issue is the McCain campaign and the mainstream media. I'd really prefer it if Sarah Palin had never come onto the national scene just as I devoutly wish that the US had not authorized torture. But she did and Cheney did. What I refuse to do is just pretend none of this happened and that it doesn't matter.

With all due respect to someone who really shouldn't be as exposed as she is: No one this unhinged, this unvetted and this delusional should have been allowed to be foisted on a national ticket and be one heart-beat away from a job she isn't faintly qualified for. If we discover that the McCain campaign simply ignored or the press simply avoided issues that cut to the core of this candidate's integrity, honesty and candor, then the system is broken. And we need to fix it. We cannot fix it until we identify the problem accurately.

That's all we're trying to do. That's our job. It's what the press is for. A media that is deferent to un-fact-checked propaganda from someone already shown to be a compulsive truth-rigger is not doing its job. And what public servants are for is answering such valid factual questions promptly, plainly and with proof if necessary. I do not believe the problem is with those in the blogosphere asking questions that have factual answers. I believe the problem is a system where the political and media elites do not think it matters if what a leading politician says is true or false. 

Once the system has stopped caring about that, the game is over. The Dish will do all it can to insist that these normal rules be maintained. And that we are able to know for sure whether what powerful people are saying is true or false.

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