YoyoUletIfansastiGetty

Head nurse Suharyono shaves a patient named Yoyo at the Galuh foundation for mental patients in East Bekasi near Jakarta on February 11, 2010 in Bekasi, Indonesia. Belief in black magic is commonplace in Indonesia, where there is limited education about mental health issues, with traditional healers instead consulted for apparent sufferers. 2007 figures suggest that 4.6% of the nation suffers from serious mental disorders. The country's population now stands at around 230 million, with only around 700 psychiatrists at 48 psychiatric hospitals available to help treat those affected. With such limited care, sufferers instead usually turn to black magic and are taken to 'dukuns' or healers who are believed to have magical powers. By Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images.

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