A reader writes:

I think you need to reevaluate your perspective on Napolitano. I'm certainly no fan of policies of the institutions she heads, for all the reasons and more that Goldberg posted about, but for the very same reasons I find the call for her resignation to be misplaced.

The core problem with calling this a "failure" is that the system that "failed" wasn't setup to detect this attack. Sure, the intent is there, but no one (well, almost no one) ever wants an attack to succeed, so that's not saying much. But none of the procedures in place were designed to stop this attack.

Therefore none of them failed. The complaints about the warning from the father are similarly off-base. 

I don't know how many warnings DHS handles a say, but I'd guess it is easily in the hundreds. No doubt, the vast majority are vague, and the target likely harmless. The father, as far as I can tell, had no specific information, just rumors and possibilities. No doubt, DHS does not have the resources to follow such leads. Nor should they, least we fall into a police state. No security system is perfect. Trying to make such a system will only lead to completely horrendous procedures.

DHS has an impossible job. If the head of DHS has to step down everytime a terrorist gets through the current security measures that job will only become even harder.

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