Reviews for the book keep pouring in. A reader writes:

I just got my copy of The View From Your Window.  I didn't know exactly what to expect, but the design of the book as a smallish cube-like shape is gorgeous.  It's a work of art in and of itself.  It was also lot of fun to show my partner "Dallas, Texas, 8 am," which I took from our window.  He had no idea I had done it.  He said, "That's our street, where's our house?"  I told him it's behind the camera!

Another writes:

I got the book today. I ordered it when I saw that you used a photo from Casper, Wyo. and  thought it was likely the one I submitted during our ridiculous snowstorm around the time you were making Cover-smallthe final push to get a photo from all 50 states. I saw it published on the blog and thought if it were in the book, I'd better get one, and enjoy the crowd-sourced price too.

Well, thank you. You showed me the window into what was my own life, in a small and satisfying way.

I sold that house this fall and moved to the nearest Big City to take the rare Better Job one can chance to secure even in this economy. Looking at the photo in the still ink-scented book tonight, I remembered the quiet of that street when it snowed; the sedan (2nd from left) parked on the street, which got messed up in a hit-and-run a year earlier and never got repaired. The "just making it month to month" neighbors.  And the cold.  Thanks for helping me see the window into who I was then.

Another:

Having been a reader of the Dish since 2002, I feel especially grateful for the daily education I've received from you over the years. This book is like the cherry on top.

My favorite is Washington, DC at 2:42 p.m. That rainy window and the wrought-iron fence outside immediately reminded me of the bedroom of a girl I used to date/visit who lived in the basement of an apartment in Adams Morgan. I loved her place, which was warm and cozy, and right in the middle of my favorite neighborhood of my favorite city. She's on the West Coast now and I haven't seen her in a few years, but thanks for helping bring back some fun memories.

Another:

I'm charmed that the copyright is held by Readers of the Daily Dish.  What a great gesture!

Another:

Count me the one dissenting voice on "The View From Your Window."  I eagerly supported this project, loved the photos, and sent my own.  Mine never showed up online but, when I read the places for the book, there was my town, Madison, NJ.  Maybe it would be my photo,  but if not it was sure to be nice as the town is pretty. Madison-New Jersey-5pm

Nope! The photo of my town, and the only one of my state, is of a parking lot.  I didn't recognize it, but my husband eventually figured out that it's behind a row of stores downtown.  I daresay every town and city in the world has its parking lots, junkyards, etc.  However, I don't see any other state in this country being represented by such a scene.

I realize you see only Newark Airport and the New Jersey Turnpike and it's all ugly, but millions of us live in much nicer places within this state.  It took some doing to choose the ugliest picture in the book from the little suburban college town I call home.

It was not deliberate; the Madison photo was picked primarily because it had a sunrise that coordinated well with the sunrise of its counterpart photo. And, for what it's worth, parking lots are featured in "Lexington, Kentucky, 1 pm" and "Cheektowaga, New York, 9 pm".  If it is any consolation, the photo above (taken at 5 pm) was sent by the reader back in June but never posted. More lovely windows from New Jersey can be found here and here. Another writes:

I got two of my books yesterday, which compelled me to order two more. I would've kept on, but my budget is limited at the moment. They're wonderful, so nice to hold. This connection across the world through the views out the window, well, it's just wonderful beyond words--all heart and eyes. Thanks for connecting and enriching us so.

Preview the book here (we just made all 200 photos visible). Buy the book here.

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