A reader writes:

As a conservative Christian, I'm glad the Rick Warren and Tom Coburn finally got around to speaking out against the Uganda bill, but at the same time I'm disappointed that it took so long, and I'm disappointed that there are so few voices condemning the bill among those leaders who claim to speak for people like me.  Having grown up as part of the politically active religious right, I've seen religious conservative leaders put their vast networks of contacts to use time and again for issues large and small even back in the days before email when they got people to start making phone calls to their friends to make sure information spread. The silence of the religious right social networks is deafening.

Religious conservatives need to be hearing about Uganda from sources like James Dobson and Focus on the Family and the American Family Association because like it or not, those are the sources that they trust. As much as I'm glad that people like you and Rachel Maddow are continuing to draw attention to what's going down in Uganda, I fear that it's mostly preaching to the choir and I worry that people like the friends and family I grew up with aren't going to take it seriously until they hear it from their leaders. Those leaders know that as much as anybody, but they're still mostly silent. I think it's time to start putting pressure on them to speak out too.

Then again, the silence on what seems like it should be obvious to everyone is a basic human rights issue is yet another reason why I'm increasingly reluctant to identify myself as a conservative.

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