A reader writes:

The post from the North Country native was a wild oversimplification of the district.  I went to school in the district and worked the state senate special election last year which put in a Democrat.  This area is not Palin country.  I live in Virginia now, "Real Virginia"...I know Palin country. There is an "us vs them" mentality in Upstate NY, but it's more about wanting to be represented by someone who is one of them--someone with blue-collar values.  This is not a front line in the culture wars.  There is a reason the GOP establishment chose a pro-choice, pro-marriage, pro-union, candidate. Mark it down, Owens will come out the victor when the polls close tonight.

I'll be gobsmacked if he does. Another writes:

I grew up in Rouses Point, New York, on the shores of Lake Champlain and arguably in one of the nicest little villages in the country. The economy, while not entirely dependent on the state and federal governments, does need their help. A victory for Hoffman would remove an advocate for the region and in its place stick a repulsive ideologue whose commitment to the cause of the conservative appears to outweigh any obligation he has to best serve the people who send him to Washington.

Thus imagine how sick I feel when I see leading Democrats write and say that a victory for Hoffman would be a victory for Democrats. These Congresspeople we elect to Washington are still servants of the People in their districts, whether political operatives wish to see it that way or not. And Doug Hoffman wants nothing of it, only wishing to push his ideological conservatism and the national agenda of the likes of Beck, Limbaugh, and crew.

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