A reader writes:

The first thing that struck me about these "unity principles" is the fact that they have largely framed themselves in opposition. While I know that a minority party usually takes this sort of stance, it still makes them sound partisan and petty. Seven of the 10 include the word "oppose."
 
The second is how nonsensical the wording of some of the points comes across. How do you develop/support/have market energy reforms THROUGH opposition to the prevailing option? You have to offer a solution.  "Workers'' rights? Why choose this wording, which is classically associated with Communist and socialist movements?  I guess it's the populism taking over.  I can only hope these are the draft forms of these points, because they are such a cobbled together mess of partisan sniping and minor issues and as someone who used to consider herself conservative.  It drives me crazy.

Compare the current commandments with the policies laid out in the '94 Contract with America. It's the difference between a party interested in governing and a party interested in venting.

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