The reader who started the thread replies:

A reader wrote, "The gatekeepers own the future."

Agreed. However, as modern consumers we're already lined-up in front of the gates through which passes the crap we're most apt to appreciate. And, we're connected to like-thinking people on Facebook and Twitter that will alert us to any crap we might miss. We largely select what we read based on what we want to hear. This is a separate problem/issue, e.g. Fox News (although the tendency is endemic). I consider myself open-minded, but I still find myself day after day getting my news through the same filters: Talking Points Memo (Josh Marshall), Washington Monthly (Steve Benen), and of course, the Dish.

It's the issue roiling the PR industry. It used to be 20 journalists reached 80% of the market. Now thousands of people comment and influence the purchasing decisions of untold numbers (quantifying the return on social media marketing is still getting sorted out). One thing's certain, it's put relating to the public back into public relations.

I don't see the large publishing houses adapting to this new reality.

We don't either. By the way, you can buy this reader's "crap" here.

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