Stefany Anne Golberg on the appeal of vegetarianism:

[V]egetarianism is, in large part, artificial. It is based neither on ritual nor on necessity. It is a diet by humans for humans. A diet of modernity, whose survival will most likely depend as much on innovations in food technology as the simplicity of the family farm. I say that is the strength of vegetarianism. It can offer a freedom that meat-eating cannot: a diet that is about choice and a liberation from the prescriptions of "normal" daily life. A whole new way of eating that doesn’t rely on the whims of Nature. In short, a form of decadence. An acceptance that, like artists, we can fashion our own food and ergo, our own lives.

Extra reminder: I'm hosting a discussion of Jonathan Safran Foer's new book, Eating Animals, at the Historic Synagogue at 6th and I Street NW Washington Dc this coming Tuesday at 7 pm.

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