Heather MacDonald doesn't appreciate how the faithful connect religion to ethics:

Would someone please provide an example of

a. someone actually claiming that murder, say, (or theft) is fine at all times and places, or

b. someone claiming that murder (or theft) is fine at all times and places because there is  no God, or

c. someone claiming that murder (or theft) is fine at all times and places because there is  no God, and then being recalled to sanity by an invocation of the Sixth (or Eighth) Commandment?
I have simply never witnessed the need to reference to God to establish the validity of our laws against extortion, say.  Real-world moral disputes are more complicated:  Is health care a right?  Who should pay for it and how much should one group pay for another’s health care?  Is economic regulation theft?  Is theft admissible to stave off starvation?  We answer these questions by drawing on our innate and developed moral intuitions and our society’s legal framework.

Does anyone really believe that Denmark and Copenhagen are going to stop enforcing contract law because they have “exhausted the patrimony” of Leviticus and are uncomfortable invoking God as the source of their commercial code?

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