Well, she has now thrown down a gauntlet that the Dish will be very eager to take up in the next few days.

Yesterday the AP ran a story describing some of the contents of the book, and arguing that many assertions in it are, like so much of what Palin has said, empirically untrue. And they provided some evidence from the real world to prove that.

This morning, Palin wrote the following in response:

"They're now erroneously reporting on the book's contents... "

The Dish did not include the AP story in our constantly expanding odd lies series because we don't have the book yet and would need it to see context, text, etc. in order to assess the AP's claims. But here we have a clear empirical assertion by Palin that we can subsequently check.

Did the AP erroneously report on the book's contents, as Palin claims?

Did they "make things up"? Well, we will soon find out.

And by the way, governor Palin, since you clearly read this blog: which of the 32 lies we have already documented can you rebut? We'd be delighted to give you a platform to clear up any factual inaccuracies or misunderstandings that we might have unwittingly published by merely relying on the public record. Presumably, you have more facts at your disposal that could disprove these odd untruths. Any time you want to make your case, we will happily publish your response in full with no edits so you can explain the vast discrepancy between observed reality and your version of it.

Or is this offer libelous as well?

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