Here's an interesting and intellectually honest book review from a Sarah Palin fan, writing in the theocon journal. First Things:

The book is not intellectually roguish, but intellectually rougish. It covers up something with the appearance of health, but we are left to wonder what is being covered up.

Indeed we are. But this is a more salient question for Adam Bellow at Harper Collins, the person who allegedly edited this book:

Her publisher did not fact check this book well (if at all). She was badly served by her publisher and editor. People who criticize me for nit-picking her use of quotations miss the point. I am a fan . . .  though now a weary one . . . and I found the errors. The publisher had to know that her critics would check every fact.

How can I in a single day with no help find error after error when I am no writer, no editor (as this blog post indicates), and no specialist?

I've emailed Bellow asking him about the fact-checking process for "Going Rogue." Getting an on-the-record confirmation that, for example, Harper Collins reviewed the medical records proving Palin's multiple medical stories (including corrected hospital records by her own account) would be a useful piece of information. Since it appears that the McCain campaign knew nothing of these rumors, and indeed, by some accounts, nothing even of Bristol's pregnancy, it would be reassuring to know that someone somewhere has actually sought proof of some of Palin's wildest embellishments or total fantasies.

A responsible editor would do due diligence and check them out, right? I'll let you know Bellow's response to the fact-checking question when I get it.

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