Brian Chase writes:

My great-grandmother was a wonderful woman. Her home was one of the warmest, most comforting places I have ever been, and many of my best memories as a child revolve around her kitchen. My great-grandmother was also a bigot. [...]

Rod’s argument is also, frankly, unfair to bigots.  My great-grandmother didn’t have much of a chance to be anything but a bigot.  Her bigotry was an accident of history, and not in any real sense a choice.  Frankly, I do not blame her for what she was.  I blame the politicians and writers and preachers who actually had the chance to shape her environment and chose to do so in a way that inflamed bigotry.  I don’t know if those people were actually bigots.  I do know that they deliberately spread the evil of bigotry, which to my mind is far more immoral.

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