Robert Reich is momentarily in agreement with Alan Greenspan:

The Street obviously detests the notion that its behemoths should be broken up. That's why the idea isn't even on the table. But it should be. No important public interest is served by allowing giant banks to grow too big to fail. Winding them down after they get into trouble is no answer. By then the damage will already have been done.

Whether it's using the antitrust laws or enacting a new Glass-Steagall Act, the Wall Street giants should be split up -- and soon.

It seems to me that this should not be an ideological matter. It's an empirical one: how do we prevent Wall Street from repeating its recklessness of the past decade? How do we ensure that no single entity can hold the rest of us to ransom as these banks did? If Obama's reform measures are milque-toast, then he will have missed a critical moment to help capitalism help itself.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.