Joe Carter circles back to the "Going Galt" phenomenon and makes an astute point:

During the Cold War-era people who held incompatible viewssuch as libertarianism and social conservatismembraced a limited form of “fusionism” in order to provide a united front against a common enemycommunism. Today, the common enemy is liberalism and the fusionism occurs not between disparate groups but within an individual. People who would laugh at the absurdity of a “Christian Muslim” seem not to recognize the similar incongruity between being a follower of Christ and an acolyte of Ayn Rand.

He also points to a cult of personality on the right:

Their defense tends to be based on a variation of a common theme: They don’t actually subscribe to those crazy views (at least not all of them), they just align themselves with a personality that does. It’s politics by proxy with a Machiavellian cult of personality twist. If any victories against liberal elites can be attributed to our favorite TV personality/failed politicians/radio host/third-rate novelist, then that cult figure, their views, their motives, and their actions, are provided blanket immunity against criticism. These St. Georges slaying the liberal dragons are placed beyond reproach. You are no more allowed to question the right’s preferred cult of personality - CoulterHannityBeckLimbaughPaulLevinRandPalinWhoever - than liberals can challenge Obama.

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