It's a far right, racist organization, but its success in recent local and European elections has made it impossible to ignore. Last night, its leader, Nick Griffin, went on BBC's Question Time in a big breakthrough for his party's legitimacy. It did not, however, go smoothly for him:

The BNP leader, seeking legitimacy on a national stage, was challenged repeatedly during the programme. His comment that a Ku Klux Klan leader was “almost totally non-violent” drew titters from the audience. When he said that he found public displays of homosexuality repulsive, an audience member said that the “feelings are mutual”. Another audience member suggested Mr Griffin should be consigned to the South Pole where “the colourless landscape will suit you”.

From Wiki:

According to its constitution, the BNP is "committed to stemming and reversing the tide of non-white immigration and to restoring, by legal changes, negotiation and consent the overwhelmingly white makeup of the British population that existed in Britain prior to 1948". The BNP proposes "firm but voluntary incentives for immigrants and their descendants to return home". The party also advocates the repeal of all anti-discrimination legislation, and restricts party membership to "indigenous British ethnic groups deriving from the class of ‘Indigenous Caucasian’". The BNP also accepts white immigrants that are assimilated into one of those ethnicities.

Last night, Griffin called Caucasians Britain's "aborigines". Here's some debate you'd be very unlikely to see on US television - both more civil and somehow more blunt:

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