Dreher doesn't blame newspaper executives for the downfall of print:

I don't know that the most brilliant and enlightened publisher with a staff of geniuses could have figured out how to make a daily newspaper survive the advent of the Internet. I think about the small corner of the newspaper world that's my bailiwick, the editorial and op-ed pages. I grew up reading whoever was on the op-ed page that day for insight and analysis into issues and current events. Now, I mostly read blogs, because it's easier for me to find the kind of information I'm interested in, and it's often written in a more lively, engaging style, frequently by people who, unlike columnists like me, are not generalists. How can a print newspaper, which has a finite amount of space, and which has to cater to a broad audience, hope to compete with that?

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