I think Obama's trip to Copenhagen was dumb, but I didn't think it was narcissistic. George Will complained that the president used the word "I" too much and thereby deemed him a narcissist. Here's Will:

In the 41 sentences of her remarks, Michelle Obama used some form of the personal pronouns "I" or "me" 44 times. Her husband was, comparatively, a shrinking violet, using those pronouns only 26 times in 48 sentences. Still, 70 times in 89 sentences conveyed the message that somehow their fascinating selves were what made, or should have made, Chicago's case compelling.

When you read the speech, it doesn't seem narcissistic in the way Will implies. But I guess that's a subjective judgment. There is, however, an objective way of judging this - comparing Obama's remarks with those of his predecessors in identical contexts. We don't have Olympic pitches to compare, so try press conferences. Mark Liberman runs the numbers on Obama, Bush and Clinton and tries to measure narcissism by the same metric Will does. You know what's coming:

I took the transcript of Obama's first press conference (from 2/9/2009), and found that he used 'I' 163 times in 7,775 total words, for a rate of 2.10%. He also used 'me' 8 times and 'my' 35 times, for a total first-person singular pronoun count of 206 in 7,775 words, or a rate of 2.65%.

For comparison, I took George W. Bush's first two solo press conferences as president (from 2/22/2001 and 3/29/2001), and found that W used 'I' 239 times in 6,681 total words, for a rate of 3.58% a rate 72% higher than Obama's rate. President Bush also used 'me' 26 times, 'my' 31 times, and 'myself' 4 times, for a total first-person singular pronoun count of 300 in 6,681 words, or a rate of 4.49% (59% higher than Obama).

For a third data point, I took William J. Clinton's first two solo press conferences as president (from 1/29/1993 and 3/23/1993), and found that he used 'I' 218 times, 'me' 34 times, 'my' 22 times, and 'myself' once, in 6,935 total words. That's a total of 275 first-person singular pronouns, and a rate of 3.14% for 'I' (51% higher than Obama), and 3.87% for first-person singular pronouns overall (50% higher than Obama).

You should see the contrast between Michelle Obama and Nancy Reagan. Some day soon, George Will will realize the blogosphere exists. And do his homework.