The Dish wasn't planning to run any more of these, but this one is simply too good. A reader writes:

Junior year of High School, we received an assignment for Spanish class in which we had to write about the Person of the Year.  Our teacher, no doubt inspired by Time Magazine, gave us free reign to write about whomever we wanted, no restrictions, no geographical boundaries. It was 1998. Everyone was talking up Bill Clinton as the logical choice for the cover story for beating impeachment, but I thought that Hillary deserved the accolade for her perseverance during such tumultuous personal and political times.

So throughout the assignment, I waxed eloquently why Hillary should be given the mantle of Person of the Year, or in Spanish, "Persona del Año." One problem: throughout the entire piece when I typed this phrase, I forgot the tilda over the n in "Año." While I received an A- for the paper, it had one interesting comment circled in red at the top. "Well done, but since you forgot the tilda in "Año," your paper was not about why Hillary Clinton was "Person of the Year" but rather why she was "Anus of the Year." Please remember, tildas matter."

A reader notes:

Actually, the teacher was wrong. Persona del Ano wouldn't mean "Anus of the Year." It would mean "Person of the Anus." "Ano del Año" would be "Anus of the Year."

Far too much time on my hands.

What would the Dish do without readers with time on their hands?

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