by Peter Suderman

Drug manufacturing and distribution is too dangerous to remain in the hands of unregulated criminals. Drug distribution needs to be the combined responsibility of doctors, the government, and a legal and regulated free market.

That's the conclusion drawn by two veteran police offers in a Washington Post op-ed today as they underline "the drug war's clear and present danger toward men and women in blue." Recognizing the radical nature of the proposal, the writers don't suggest a wholesale reinvention of the nation's drug policy, but, instead, argue for allowing individual states to implement different drug policies as they see fit. 

My Reason colleague
Jacob Sullum adds:


Federalism would not only allow instructive experimentation; it would allow national politicians to avoid taking positions on emotionally charged local issues that the Constitution leaves to the states. Californians should not have to worry about the president's views on medical marijuana, and the president should not have to worry about the political ramifications of coming down on one side or the other. 

Saner, safer, more humane drug policy? Smart cops want it. So does a majority of the American people. When will America's political class?

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